Artificial Dispute Resolution

Might we see arbitral disputes or even criminal trials being decided by AI?

Using Artificial intelligence (AI) or machine learning technology, a team of researchers has predicted outcomes in judicial decisions at the European Court of Human Rights (EctHR) with 79% accuracy, reports Times of India. The AI method, developed by researchers from University College London (UCL), University of Sheffield and US-based University of Pennsylvania is the first to predict the outcomes of a major international court by automatically analysing case text using a machine learning algorithm.

"We don't see AI replacing judges or lawyers but we think they will find it useful for rapidly identifying patterns in cases that lead to certain outcomes," said Nikolaos Aletras, who led the study at UCL's computer science department. "It could also be a valuable tool for highlighting which cases are most likely to be violations of the European Convention on Human Rights," Aletras added. In developing the method, the team found that judgments by the ECtHR are highly correlated to non-legal facts rather than directly legal arguments, suggesting that judges of the Court are 'realists' rather than 'formalists'.

SJP @DigitalAsian - ShareYaar

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